Blew notes
tornandfrayed:

"When I heard Coleman Hawkins, I learned to play ballads" - Miles Davis

tornandfrayed:

"When I heard Coleman Hawkins, I learned to play ballads" - Miles Davis

A white supremacist charged with killing three people near two Jewish community facilities in suburban Kansas City this week posted more than 12,000 messages on a racist website which carries the slogan “No Jews, Just Right,” according to an organization that tracks hate groups.

The online activity by Frazier Glenn Cross follows a trend in which prolific posters on hate online forums are becoming “disproportionately responsible” for racist murders and mass killings, according to a report released on Thursday by the Southern Poverty Law Center, a non-profit civil rights organization.

The report said nearly 100 people in the last five years have been murdered by frequent users of one white supremacist website, Stormfront. The site describes itself as a community of “White Nationalists” and “the voice of the new, embattled White minority.”

“It has been a magnet for the deadly and deranged,” said Heidi Beirich, author of the report.

laughingsquid:

Record Store Day, An Annual Celebration of Independently Owned Record Stores
andyaderintotrellicktower:

Trellick Tower. Andy Aderinto

andyaderintotrellicktower:

Trellick Tower. Andy Aderinto

coffeewithnaima:

 Jazz it up a little
merkism:

trelligraf:

Chik - Merk - Corze - Zomby. Graffiti
Great pic from Trellick of our wall…thanks for sharing!

Trellick Tower. Andy Aderinto

merkism:

trelligraf:

Chik - Merk - Corze - Zomby. Graffiti

Great pic from Trellick of our wall…thanks for sharing!

Trellick Tower. Andy Aderinto
andyaderintotrellicktower:

Trellick Tower. Andy Aderinto

andyaderintotrellicktower:

Trellick Tower. Andy Aderinto

Jazziversaries April 19th

Alexis Korner  (guitar) 1928-1984 :: Alexis Korner was a British blues musician and radio broadcaster, who has sometimes been referred to as “a Founding Father of British Blues”. A major influence on the sound of the British music scene in the 1960s, Korner was instrumental in bringing together various English blues musicians.

In 1961, Korner and Cyril Davies formed Blues Incorporated, initially a loose-knit group of musicians with a shared love of electric blues and R&B music. The group included, at various times, such influential musicians as Charlie Watts, Jack Bruce, Ginger Baker, Long John Baldry, Graham Bond, Danny Thompson and Dick Heckstall-Smith. It also attracted a wider crowd of mostly younger fans, some of whom occasionally performed with the group, including Mick Jagger, Keith Richards, Brian Jones, Geoff Bradford, Rod Stewart, John Mayall and Jimmy Page.

One story is that the Rolling Stones went to stay at Korner’s house late one night, in the early 1960s, after a performance. They entered in the accepted way, by climbing in through the kitchen window, to find Muddy Waters’ band sleeping on the kitchen floor.

Although Cyril Davies left the group in late-1962, Blues Incorporated continued to record, with Korner at the helm, until 1966. However, by that time its originally stellar line-up (and crowd of followers) had mostly left to start their own bands. “While his one-time acolytes the Rolling Stones and Cream made the front pages of music magazines all over the world, Korner was relegated to the role of ‘elder statesman’.”

Although he himself was a blues purist, Korner criticised better-known British blues musicians during the blues boom of the late 1960s for their blind adherence to Chicago blues, as if the music came in no other form. He liked to surround himself with jazz musicians and often performed with a horn section drawn from a pool that included, among others, saxophone players Art Themen, Mel Collins, Dick Heckstall-Smith, Lol Coxhill,Dick Morrissey, John Surman and trombonist Mike Zwerin.

While touring Scandinavia he first joined forces with guitarist and singer Peter Thorup, together forming the band New Church, who were one of the support bands at the Rolling Stones Free Concert in Hyde Park, London, on 5 July 1969. Jimmy Page reportedly found out about a new singer, Robert Plant, who had been jamming with Korner, who wondered why Plant had not yet been discovered. Plant and Korner were in the process of recording a full album with Plant on vocals until Page had asked him to join “the New Yardbirds”, aka Led Zeppelin. Only two songs are in circulation from these recordings: “Steal Away” and “Operator”. Alexis Korner gave one of his last radio interviews to BBC Midlands on the Record Collectors Show with Mike Adams and the Late Chris Savory.

In 1970 Korner and Thorup formed a big-band ensemble, C.C.S. - short for “The Collective Consciousness Society” - which had several hit singles produced by Mickie Most, including a version of Led Zeppelin’s “Whole Lotta Love”, which was used as the theme for BBC’s Top Of The Pops between 1971 and 1981.

In the 1970s Korner’s main career was in broadcasting. In 1973 he presented a unique 6-part documentary on BBC Radio 1, The Rolling Stones Story, and in 1977 he established a Sunday-night blues and soul show on Radio 1, Alexis Korner’s Blues and Soul Show, which ran until 1981.

Alex Hill(piano) 1906-1937 :: Alex Hill was an American jazz pianist.

Hill was a child prodigy on piano, which he learned from his mother. While studying at Shorter College he met Alphonse Trent, and began arranging material for him. He graduated in 1922 and played in various territory bands, including Terrence Holder’s. From 1924 to 1926 he led his own ensemble; later in 1926 he played with Speed Webb, and in 1927 he spent time with Mutt Carey’s Jeffersonians and Paul Howard’s Quality Serenaders.

Late in 1927 he relocated to Chicago and held a job as an arranger for the Melrose Music Publishing Company, while simultaneously arranging for the Carroll Dickerson Orchestra. He played with Jimmy Wade in 1928, Jimmie Noone in 1929, and Sammy Stewart in 1930.

While on tour with Stewart he moved to New York City. There he arranged for Paul Whiteman, Benny Carter, Claude Hopkins, Andy Kirk, Ina Ray Hutton, the Mills Blue Rhythm Orchestra, and Duke Ellington. He also did charts for Fats Waller, Eddie Condon, and Willie Bryant. Additionally, he became staff arranger for the Mills Music Company. He and Fats Waller did a show together in New York called Hello 1931, and accompanied Adelaide Hall.

Hill again put together his own group in 1935, but after playing at the Savoy Ballroom, he disbanded the ensemble due to his tuberculosis. He moved back to Little Rock, Arkansas, and died in 1937 at age 30.

Most of his recordings can be found on Alex Hill 1928-34, released on CD by Timeless Records in 1998. It includes recordings he made with Albert Wynn, Jimmy Wade, Jimmie Noone, Junie Cobb, Eddie Condon, and The Hokum Trio, in addition to 11 tunes he did as bandleader.

Dick Pearce (trumpet) 1951 :: Birthday greetings to trumpeter Dick Pearce. Dick began playing cornet at the age of 12 in the Boys’ Brigade and joined Ewell village’s local brass band a year later. At 15 he became interested in jazz and attended a Sunday morning rehearsal band run by the dance bandleader Ken Macintosh. Soon after, he joined Bill Ashton’s National Youth Jazz Orchestra where he met many like-minded young musicians.

At 17 he spent three and a half extremely disillusioned years in the army (The Household Cavalry) supposedly as a bandsman. He’d played Haydn’s Trumpet Concerto for his audition and expected to receive musical tuition after signing on the dotted line, but for most of his service he found himself sitting on a horse playing bugle calls. Demobbed from the army in April 1972, he began playing with (what was considered) some of the ‘freer’ bands of that time - led by Graham Collier, Dudu Pukwana, Pat Evans and Keith Tippet.

In the mid to late 70s he was drawn more towards harmonically structured improvisation (post-Bebop?), playing with jazz groups led by the likes of Don Rendell, Michael Garrick and Mike Westbrook, while also playing in an abundance of settings with his own generation of young jazz musicians. (All interspersed with various commercial gigs and a few part time day jobs of course).

In 1980 Dick joined The Ronnie Scott Quintet, with whom he travelled all over the world for the following 14 years. The band included John Critchinson (piano), Ron Mathewson (double bass), Martin Drew (drums) and Ronnie Scott (tenor sax). In 1990 the quintet became a sextet with the addition of Mornington Lockett on tenor sax.

In more recent years Dick has been heard with - Alan Barnes / Don Weller’s ‘Tribute to Cannonball Adderley Band’. The Don Weller Big Band. Tim Richards’ ‘Great Spirit’. John Williams’ ‘New Perspectives’. Stan and Clarke Tracey’s ‘Ellingtonia’. ‘PD3 with Dick Pearce’ (PD3 = Pete Downes trio). John Critchinson’s tribute to Ronnie Scott band.

Dudley Moore  (piano) 1935-2002 :: Dudley Moore was an English actor, comedian, composer and musician.

Moore first came to prominence as one of the four writer-performers in the ground-breaking comedy revue Beyond the Fringe in the early 1960s, and then became famous as half of the highly popular television double-act he formed with Peter Cook.

His fame as a comedy film actor was later heightened by success in hit Hollywood films such as Foul Play, 10 with Bo Derek and Arthur in the late 1970s and early 1980s, respectively. He received an Oscar nomination for the latter role. He was frequently referred to in the media as “Cuddly Dudley” or “The Sex Thimble”, a reference to his short stature and reputation as a “ladies’ man”.

Moore’s musical talent won him an organ scholarship to Magdalen College, Oxford. While studying music and composition there, he also performed with Alan Bennett in the Oxford Revue. Bennett then recommended him to the producer putting together Beyond the Fringe, a comedy revue, where he was to first meet Peter Cook. Beyond the Fringe was at the forefront of the 1960s satire boom and after success in Britain it transferred to the United States, where it was also a hit.

During his university years, Moore took a great interest in jazz and soon became an accomplished jazz pianist and composer. He began working with such leading musicians as John Dankworth and Cleo Laine. In 1960, he left Dankworth’s band to work on Beyond the Fringe. During the 1960s he formed the Dudley Moore Trio, with drummer Chris Karan and bassist Pete McGurk. Following McGurk’s suicide in June 1968, Peter Morgan joined the group as his replacement.

Moore’s admitted principal musical influences were Oscar Peterson and Erroll Garner. In an interview he recalled the day he finally mastered Garner’s unique left-hand strum and was so excited that he walked around for several days with his left hand constantly playing that cadence. His early recordings included “My Blue Heaven”, “Lysie Does It”, “Poova Nova”, “Take Your Time”, “Indiana”, “Sooz Blooz”, “Baubles, Bangles & Beads”, “Sad One for George” and “Autumn Leaves”. The trio performed regularly on British television, made numerous recordings and had a long-running residency at Peter Cook’s London nightclub, the Establishment.

Moore composed the soundtracks for the films Bedazzled, Inadmissible Evidence, Staircase and Six Weeks, among others.

Tommy Benford(drums) 1905 -1994 :: was an African American jazz drummer.

Tommy Benford was born in Charleston, West Virginia.He and his older brother, tuba player Bill Benford, were both orphans who studied music at the Jenkins Orphanage in Charleston, South Carolina. He went on tour with the school band, traveling with them to England in 1914.

In 1920, he was working with the Green River Minstrel Show. Benford recorded with Jelly Roll Morton in 1928 and 1930. He also played with Duke Ellington, Fats Waller and Eddie South. During the 1930s he stayed in Europe for a longer time, where he recorded with Coleman Hawkins, Bill Coleman, Joe Turner, Django Reinhardt, and Sidney Bechet. During the 1940s he worked with Noble Sissle, with Snub Mosley and Bob Wilber in New York City. At Jimmy Ryan’s club he gigged with Rex Stewart. During the 1950s he toured with Muggsy Spanier and with Jimmy Archey.